Asked by Tiffany Rigdon on Thursday, August 19
I would like to start a vegetable garden in my back yard. Unfortunatly, the best place for the garden is where our dogs use the restroom. I know I need to put a lot of prep and money into the soil to get it ready for planting but before I do, I need to know if I will be waisting my time. Does the pet urine ruin the soil? Can I plant in it? Should I do a raised bed garden instead?

3 Answers to This Question

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Ideally, for composting, you want to use manure and urine from an animal that doesn't eat meat products. Livestock is good. Dogs and other carnivores are bad, because they can carry bad bacterias.
I think the raised bed is the best idea for the area you are talking about.
Answered by Candace Letson on Thursday, August 19
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If you supplement the soil it should be ok to use for a garden, just make sure to water it heavily before using it to try and flush out some of the urine chemicals. You'll need to add some supplements to the soil as well like peat moss and some type of plant food (since the urine has probably killed a lot of the soil nutrients.

That said, I would suggest that a raised bed would be best to keep the dogs out and help you make a fresh start, even if it was just raised a few inches it would help for sure.

And once the garden is in definitely make sure the dogs aren't peeing there anymore!
Answered by Jason Logsdon on Thursday, August 19
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Hey! Wait a minute. Don't composters use urine as a starting agent to get their compost piles going? Is there a difference between human and animal urine?
Answered by R. Stewart on Thursday, August 19

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